Jury rights outreach – Dover (2/2/16)

jury outreach

Rights Brigade conducted another jury nullification outreach operation at the Strafford County Courthouse today, reaching 67 jurors in an effort to help them understand their right to nullify bad laws and acquit victimless “criminals.”

It was a relatively straightforward outreach effort today, with all 67 attending jurors accepting our fliers.

At one point, I attempted to hand a flier to a man who identified himself as a judge. He refused the flier at first, figuring that I was doing campaign outreach, but when he saw the fliers I was holding he perked up. He said that he was aware of NHJury.com (the organization that prints the fliers we use), as he has seen a flood of our fliers in his courtroom. He then smiled, and said he appreciated what we were doing.

“Most people don’t care. Caring is good. We’re happy when jurors take their responsibility seriously.”

We’ll be back at the Strafford County Courthouse 2 weeks from today if anyone is interested in taking part.

First year review (2015)

RB text

Inspired by the huge potential for change provided by the sheer number of liberty activists brought to New Hampshire by the Free State Project, the Rights Brigade was founded in January of 2015. Its mission was to organize and direct activism efforts advancing human liberty, with a focus on effectiveness and professionalism, and document these efforts.

The challenge presented to building and effectively mobilizing a grassroots army on such a scale was stark: a staff of one and zero funding. Even more challenging, the Rights Brigade eschews both a traditional for-profit system and the usual nonprofit model. Instead, it relies entirely on volunteer activism, with leadership organizing operations and committing to the organization’s activism goals, compensated only by voluntary donations in Bitcoin, and by the satisfaction of knowing the world has been made a better place. [Read more…]

Jury rights outreach – Dover (12/15/15)

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Today I led a jury rights outreach operation in Dover. I was joined by fellow Rights Brigade member and all-around super activist James Davis.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict a defendant, not based on the letter of the law, but based on their conscience. The right to nullify is specifically protected by New Hampshire law. Jury rights activists pass out informational pamphlets in front of courthouses before jury selections informing jurors of this right.

This was not the first selection for this particular jury pool, so very few jurors were present. Still, we passed out pamphlets to those who attended, as well as others present entering the courthouse.

All in all, 8 jurors and bystanders were reached.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (9/1/15)

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Today I once again led a jury nullification outreach operation in Dover.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict based not on the letter of the law, but on the morality of the situation. Activists inform jurors of their rights by handing out pamphlets.

James Davis assisted me in the operation.

Towards the end of the operation, the deputy sheriff came out and politely reminded us to keep some distance from the door for security reasons. He maintained that the court was perfectly fine with what we were doing. This is the third or fourth time we have been talked to at this location because of our position relative to the door. Maybe it contains a power we were unaware of?

126 jurors were reached.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (8/18/15)

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Today I once again led a jury rights outreach operation in Dover.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict a defendant not based on the letter of the law, but on the morality of the circumstances. Activists hand pamphlets to jurors informing them of their rights.

I was joined by James Davis and Seamus Casey for this operation.

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James was addressed by a couple courthouse guards regarding how close to the side door he was standing (the guards had an issue with him being too close to the door before). They left a makeshift sign near the door to prevent activists from getting too close.

Strafford Country Sheriff David Dubois came over to explain the door situation, that a guard was concerned about blocking jurors from entering with ease. He encouraged us to keep up our activism, saying he really appreciated what we were doing.

57 jurors were reached.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (8/4/15)

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Rights Brigade activists once again braved the rain to bring jury nullification education outreach to jurors in Dover.

Activists hand out pamphlets informing jurors of their right to nullify bad laws, a right that is protected under New Hampshire law.

James Davis carried out the operation. Around half the potential jurors had apparently been notified via email that they were not required to attend, but ended up coming anyway, much to their chagrin.

A court employee asked for a flyer, saying he had been “noticing everyone reading them inside and want to see what the fuss is about.”

All those offered pamphlets took one. 61 jurors were reached.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (7/21/15)

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Today I joined fellow Rights Brigade activists in conducting a jury rights information operation in Dover.

We handed out pamphlets informing jurors of their right to nullify bad laws by voting not guilty regardless of the defendant is in the legal wrong.

I was joined by fellow activists James Davis, Seamus Casey, and Nicholas Boyle.

The operation was carried out without incident. 22 jurors were reached.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (7/7/15)

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Today I once again joined a group of activists for jury nullification outreach in Dover.

I was joined by James Davis, Nicholas Boyle, and Seamus Casey (not pictured). We handed out pamphlets informing jurors of their right to nullify bad laws by voting not guilty.

Most jurors had already received a pamphlet during prior selection outreach operations. Still, we succeeded in reaching 21 new jurors. More than one expressed approval of our activities, and asked for more information about us and our cause.

As a gesture of politeness, James held the door open to the side-entrance to the courthouse to allow jurors to enter more easily (the door was self-locking, and every time the flow of jurors was interrupted the guard would have to go open the door again). During his smoking break, one of the guards casually mentioned that the door is supposed to remain closed between entries. James calmly stated that he was just trying to be polite to incoming jurors, at which point the guard became confrontational, ordering James to leave the door closed “because I’m telling you to.” Towards the end of the selection, another guard came out and insisted we stand 1-3 feed further away from the door. One is left to assume all this was for a perfectly good security reason.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (6/9/15)

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Today I once again assisted in a jury outreach operation in Dover. I was joined by James Davis, Nicholas Boyle, and Donna Priolo (not pictured). Together we handed out pamphlets informing jurors of their rights to nullify bad laws.

Most of the jurors present at the selection had already received our pamphlets at a previous outreach event. Still, we reached 20 new jurors. We also earned some popular goodwill by holding the door open for jurors, as well as watching a gentleman’s car while he ran inside to deliver something.

Jury rights outreach – Dover (5/19/15)

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For the first time, today I participated in jury rights outreach in front of the William F. Grimes Justice and Administration Building in Dover. I was joined by Randy Clemens, Donna and Rich Priolo, James Davis, and Troy Brown.

We passed out pamphlets from NHJury.com to prospective jurors at a jury selection. We sufficiently covered the side and main entrances, distributing pamphlets to jurors and holding the door open (much appreciated on the rainy day that it was).

The public was largely receptive, and almost none refused the pamphlet.