Jury Rights Outreach – Manchester (2/27/17)

Today I conducted jury nullification outreach to jurors in Manchester.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict a defendant because doing so, while applying the law, would yield an unjust result. By so doing a jury can nullify a bad law that has come to cause harm instead of good. Jury rights activists such as myself inform jurors of this right by distributing pamphlets in front of courthouses.

This was the first selection of the pool, so the courthouse had a long, snaking stream of jurors incoming. I was not intending to lead up the operation, but apparently the activist who was supposed to never showed up, so I ended up doing it myself.

I reached 80 jurors.

Community Self-Defense Class – Portsmouth (2/25/17)

I led a free self-defense class in Portsmouth.

An armed and trained society is safe, self-reliant, and free. To further this aim, I teach free self-defense classes to the community to help them to protect themselves and their neighbors from physical harm.

This was the first of such classes I had taught in the area.

Despite minimal marketing consisting mainly of word-of-mouth, the class had a large turnout. Main techniques taught were a defensive posture which was practiced against a flurry of random attacks; elbow and knee strikes from the clinch; and various escapes from wrist holds and chokes. All in all, the class focused on practical self-defense in a chaotic environment to simulate an attack situation.

[Read more…]

Jury Rights Outreach – Dover (2/21/17)

I once again headed up jury nullification outreach in Dover.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict a defendant who otherwise would be guilty based on the facts of the case, but where a conviction would lead to a morally unjust result. Jury rights activists inform jurors of this right by distributing informative pamphlets in front of courthouses.

I was met with a pool of jurors very satisfied with the weather, since last time they were severely snowed upon in the parking lot. One woman, however, inquired if I was with the court, predicting my response to be negative. She was not friendly and had a University of New Hampshire jacket, indicating she probably worked in public education. No wonder the hostility towards the practice of freedom!

A friend was in the jury pool, and told me that he had seen many jurors reading through the pamphlets and internalizing the information. Great news, I guess we aren’t wasting our time!

Despite reaching well over a hundred jurors last time, I still managed to get to 60 new ones this time.

Jury Rights Outreach – Dover (2/7/17)

On this wintry day I conducted jury nullification outreach in Dover.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides they won’t convict a defendant who would otherwise be guilty, on the basis of the law itself being immoral. This is commonly advocated as a way to nullify victimless crimes such as marijuana. Jury right activists hand out informative pamphlets outside of courthouses to educate jurors of this right.

This was a cold day in the middle of a snowstorm, and many jurors were upset that the selection had not been called off. Even though it was the first selection of the pool, for some reason jurors were forced to use the side door, which caused the line to get through security to snake well into the parking lot. The jurors were not happy about being stuck in the storm.

I ran into a friend who encouraged his fellow jurors to pay heed to the information I was passing out.

In total, 120 jurors were reached.

Jury Rights Outreach – Concord (2/6/17)

I once again conducted jury nullification outreach in Concord.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict an otherwise guilty defendant, not on the basis of whether or not the law applies, but on whether applying the law (in the particular case or in general) would yield an unjust result. Jury nullification advocates educate jurors about this right by distributing informative pamphlets in front of courthouses.

Atypically for the last selection of the jury pool, there was quite the group of jurors around, and most hadn’t received a pamphlet. This allowed me to reach many of the jurors who were at the first selection of that pool, who previously had been missed.

One juror instantly recognized jury nullification, and inquired about InfoWars. Apparently the famed conservatarian conspiracy personality Alex Jones has been educating his audience on jury nullification as well interdimensional aliens. Good to know.

I reached an even 70 new jurors.

State House Hearings – Concord (2/1/17)

Today I headed to Concord to advocate for liberty in the New Hampshire State House.

There were quite a few hearings to attend, though the only one of interest for which I was prepared to testify was SB 12, Constitutional Carry. Since that hearing already had droves of pro-liberty folks testifying in favor (to the point where the committee chair asked attendees if they wanted to forego their testimony for the sake of saving time), however, I opted not to testify, but instead sign up in support (or opposition) of various key bills.

To streamline my efforts while in Concord, I took advantage of the excellent bill review by the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance, which does a fantastic job of tracking and reviewing legislation, and overall acts as a great advocate for liberty at the State House.

These are the bills for which I signed in support/opposition:

SB 12: Constitutional Carry, or the right to carry a firearm concealed without a permit. I signed in support.

HB 590-FN: Establishing a state bank. I signed in opposition.

HB 633-FN: Allowing health insurance policies to be sold without mandates. I signed in support.

HB 640: Relative to the penalties for possession of marijuana. I signed in support.

HB 644: Extending the interest and dividends tax to capital gains, increasing exemptions from the tax, and providing for retirement system contributions on behalf of employers other than the state. I signed in opposition.

HB 656: Relative to the legalization and regulation of marijuana. I signed in support.

Jury Rights Outreach – Concord (1/23/17)

Today I conducted a jury nullification outreach operation in Concord.

Jury nullification is where a hung jury prevents a defendant from being convicted, even if the letter of the law would say otherwise. This is used to prevent unjust applications of the law, or unjust laws from being enforced. Jury rights activists inform jurors of this right by distributing pamphlets outside of courthouses.

A woman was smoking outside the courthouse and asked what I was doing. I explained I was educating jurors, and she said she had done jury transcript work for years. She remarked how New Hampshire juries are conviction-happy, which is why she suspects she will never be on a jury (she was much less in favor of convicting defendants as a rule). She also mentioned how it’s not really a jury of your peers, as some of her neighbors have been called for jury duty again and again, while others such as herself never are. [Read more…]

Jury Rights Outreach – Dover (1/17/17)

I conducted another jury nullification outreach operation in Dover, and had a brief interaction with some court officials.

Jury nullification is when a jury decides not to convict a defendant, not based on whether or not the law would technically apply, but on the justness of that application. This approach is mainly used to nullify victimless crimes, where a law or certain application thereof would put someone behind bars who had hurt no one. Jury rights activists inform jurors of this right by distributing pamphlets in front of courthouses.

As the second selection in this jury pool, jurors entered through the side door to the courthouse, and most had already received a pamphlet. Still, a few had slipped through the cracks last time, and received a flyer for the first time. [Read more…]

Rights Brigade Founder Interviewed by CoinTelegraph

The Rights Brigade’s founder Joël Valenzuela was interviewed by CoinTelegraph about our January jury nullification campaign.

In the interview for the Bitcoin and cryptocurrency publication, Valenzuela outlines the vision for using a Bitcoin crowdfund to incentivize a statewide activism operation, as well as plans for more campaigns like this in the future.

Find out more about our jury nullification campaign here. Go here to support the Rights Brigade.

Jury Rights Outreach – Concord (1/9/17)

Today I headed to Concord to conduct jury nullification outreach.

Jury nullification is where a jury decides not to convict a defendant because such a conviction would yield an unjust result. This is commonly done to negate victimless crimes, where a would-be criminal has harmed no one. Jury rights activists inform jurors of this right by distributing informative pamphlets in front of courthouses.

I set out to conduct the jury outreach operation alone. Regrettably, during the entire usually 47-minute drive, I was stuck behind a school bus with no option for passing, and as such I missed the selection entirely. Oh well, the same pool of jurors will be around for another round later this month, and that time they will be reached.

This operation was conducted as part of the January jury nullification campaign. You can track the campaign’s progress, and donate to support its completion, here.